VOICE OF IMPACT: Rosaliz Jimenez

Holding yourself accountable is no easy feat, both professionally and personally.

Working for multiple magazines in an age where print ruled all, Rosaliz Jimenez is no stranger to accountability. During her time working as an editor at InStyle magazine before anything was published, it was fact checked by a third party.

“We exist in the wild wild west of media…” Rosaliz shares with us, now as the Director of Fashion and Photography at Dia&Co.

Let’s set the stage, back before the internet took off and everyone had an Instagram login. One article had hours of work behind it - from research, interviews, fact checking and even a pass through lawyers to make sure journalist, editors, and the publisher were accountable to the information.  

Flash forward to 2018 and the credibility is not so much in the quality, as it is in the quantity of hearts, thumbs up, and fans.

You’ve heard us say this before, if you have a LinkedIn, Facebook Page, Instagram or Twitter, you have a personal brand, a reputation, and a voice.  No one is stopping you from claiming yourself as an expert, but you, and as a conscious capitalist, should be aware of what you know, and surround yourself with folks that will help you with what you don’t know.

If you are getting paid to speak on behalf of a product or service, don’t just put the money where your mouth is, make sure you’re staying true to your brand values and personal mission.

Once your reputation has soured in the public eye, it will take you three times the effort to make it right. Before you get caught up in momentum, remember the important of meaningful communication.

Rosaliz has a reputation for listening to the market, beyond just social media comments she hosts focus groups to understand the emotional response to images, words, and clothing styles. She found that many people say they want to see models that look like them, and represent who they are in the market, but when it came time to measuring their automatic reaction, the results were repetitive.

The standards that mass media has ingrained in our minds reveals a stereotypical answer. “It doesn’t make it right, but it still happens, people will be drawn to the same type of person that has been put in front of their face for generations,” shares Rosaliz Jimenez.

Today, your voice.

Your personal brand.

Has the potential to make social shift by reflecting the new norm.

 

Once your reputation has soured in the public eye, it will take you three times the effort to make it right. Before you get caught up in momentum, remember the important of meaningful communication.

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Self (EQ)

Accountability goes out the window when you’re rushed to claim your space in the industry. When worry and anxiety arises, you’re at risk at not making the best decisions for your brand, your workforce, and the community which your business exists in.

Calling all conscious capitalists to pump their brakes before making anxiety-induced decisions try this:

Catch the underlying assumption and chase down logical conclusions

If you fear attending a party I might ask myself, “What consequence do I fear?”

You  might decide, “I fear meeting new people.”

But what is the consequence of that? “They might not like me!”

But what is the consequence of that? “I will feel upset.”

But what is the consequence of that? “I will feel that I am unlikable!”

And so on.  Then you can go on to, “But how will I deal with that?”

“I will remember people who do like me.”

“I will soon forget about the party.”

“I will remember that I can be wrong when assuming people don’t like me.”

Strategy

Being an expert is all in how you show, don’t tell. When you take a look at your marketing mix, what are you really giving that is of value? How are you showing your customer that you are the expert.

 
TRENDSSahar Paz